Subscriptions and Feeds



Translate This Page


Search



  • WWW http://mybookofrai.typepad.com

Stats





« October 23, 2005 - October 29, 2005 | Main | November 6, 2005 - November 12, 2005 »

November 03, 2005

Translations by Farid Zadi

I thank everyone who has emailed me about the blogs with their kind supportive words. If you have questions, comments or suggestions I encourage you to post them in the comments field. The contributors appreciate feedback and if you email me I am the only one who gets to read it.

I know that some readers use translation software. Babelfish will not give you precise translations but it is good enough to get a broad idea about the content. There are two translation forums I know of Word Reference and International Forum. I don't know much about them but the Arabic and French translation assistance seems to be very good. Word reference also seems to be more moderated than International Forum is.

November 02, 2005

Umair Salam from Salambazar by Farid Zadi

I'd like to introduce another writer to Ya Rayi Our Rai by linking to a post about fasting during Ramadan. Click on the gallery to see the wonderful work by artist Sadia Salam.

Readership ranking by country

I'm bumping up this post to add some new countries. I'm trying to add a mapstats link to this blog.

Readership ranking by country:

1. France

2. United States (very close second to France)

3. Other continental European countries: Spain, Netherlands, Italy, Belgium, Germany

4. UK, Australia and Canada (very close to #3)

5. Middle Eastern Countries: UAE, Bahrain and Saudi Arabia

6. Turkey, Pakistan and India

7. Maghreb: Algeria, Morocco and Tunisia

8. Malaysia, Singapore and Indonesia

9. Philippines, Sweden, Switzerland, Japan and Korea

10. We've been getting more page views from Finland,  Norway, SLovenia and The Ukraine.

11. We haven't gotten many, I mention it just for fun. South Africa, Ghana, Mozambique and Senegal!

12. Many other countries but the number of page views is not noteworthy yet.

I tried installing one of those visible visitors by country and for some reason it came out scrambled and messed up the site. It took me several hours to fix the site each time I tried.

November 01, 2005

Alimentum Journal

Alimentum
The Literature of Food

The Only Literary Review All About Food

Original Fiction, Poetry, and Essays

Celebrating its Debut Winter 2006 Issue – December 1st, 2005

Debut Issue features

Oliver Sacks

Mark Kurlansky

Cortney Davis

Clifford A. Wright

Carly Sachs

Janna McMahan

Richard Berlin

Leslie McGrath

…many more!

Alimentum

unique 6” x 7 ½” format

full color cover, spot illustrations throughout

the personal spin on food

where do you get your food?

Alimentum Journal

Continue reading "Alimentum Journal" »

October 31, 2005

Thanksgiving Turkey from the office of Alice Waters

Dear Friends,

With Thanksgiving coming, we thought you might like to know how to order a Heritage Turkey. The Bourbon Red and the American Bronze are two of the several historic breeds of turkey that our forebears ate before the market was monopolized by the Broadbreasted White, developed in the 1950s and now the sole variety in large-scale production. The Bourbon Red and the American Bronze have firmer, darker meat with much more pronounced turkey flavor than the standard bird; they are both delicious. Frank Reese Jr., whose turkeys are directly descended from the birds of the 19th century, and his coalition of five small-scale turkey farmers are growing these birds, and Heritage Foods USA is helping to distribute them. They deserve our support!

Turkey


Continue reading "Thanksgiving Turkey from the office of Alice Waters" »

October 30, 2005

Duman Festival: Celebrating Tradition by Karen Shih

Duman_fest

Life goes on in a small town in rural Philippines. All manner of modern conveniences are embraced to make life easier. Once a year however, specifically when the winter winds from Siberia blow down on the tropical islands, the townsfolk pay homage to the traditional way of producing a light golden green rice cereal from half-ripe red-husked glutinous rice called lacatan malutu.

What has turned into a grassroots festival is steeped in the Filipino culture of bayanihan (cooperative effort between neighbouring farms) during harvest season where singing and guitar-playing accompany the rhythmic pounding of the mortar and pestle. The task that is by nature arduous is lightened by camaraderie and merry-making.

For our first post on Ya Rayi, in typical Filipino fashion, we extend our hospitality to our readers - with our hearts wide open. We invite you to know us better by joining in on the preparation for the festivities. ('We' and 'our' because there are two Filipinas on the Ya Rayi roll now.)

I wrote about last year’s Duman Festival on my blog. This year, I’m making good on my promise to document the process of bringing it from the field to the table. In fact, I was out taking pictures of the lacatan malutu yesterday, with my two companions comparing (regular) rice leaves and stalks with those of the lacatan. Most of the documentation will be on the festival website but I may update this entry from time to time.

Salamat!

Seattle's International District: Then and Now by Harley Spiller

Seattle's International District: Then and Now

In May 2001, while walking in Seattle, Washington's Chinatown, more commonly called the "ID" or International District because of its pan-Asian and African-American communities, I passed a store selling imported Chinese provisions.  Once-new merchandise had long ago faded in the sun and turned antique.  I sidled past, but intricate, grapefruit-skin yellow shelving caught my eye.  In I went, through the heavy wood and glass doors, sounding a bell.  The nearer of two Chinese gentlemen watching television in folding lawn chairs in a back room rose, and started toward me, while I scanned the old wooden shelves partially full with canned goods, cleaning implements, clothing and a variety of imports. A homemade galvanized steel tea caddy with matching scoops proffered a dozen different loose teas; a metal rack displayed Asian flower and vegetable seeds; there were herbal medicines of every description, and lots more.

Continue reading "Seattle's International District: Then and Now by Harley Spiller " »

Book of Rai Food Forum

Recent Comments

February 2007

Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat
        1 2 3
4 5 6 7 8 9 10
11 12 13 14 15 16 17
18 19 20 21 22 23 24
25 26 27 28